Interesting facts

Is there an historical story behind the song “Queen Anne’s Revenge”?
Yes, it was the ship of Edward Teach, known as the famous pirate “Blackbeard”
Edward Teach joined the crew of Capt. Benjamin Hornigold joined in 1716. In very little time, he became Hornigold’s protégé, and soon was given a captured sloop with six cannons to command while still serving under Hornigold.
In1717 Hornigold and Teach encountered a large ship sailing under the French flag called “Concorde”. Many men were killed in a bloody battle and finally the crew of the Concorde surrendered. Teach asked if he could be given the command of the captured ship. Due to the fact that Hornigold was quite old for being a pirate and had become quite rich over the years he knew he could retire and handed over the command of the Concorde to Teach who soon will become very famous as Blackbeard due to his rich and full black beard, under which he placed several slow matches prior to every battle to make the beard look like it was burning. Many captains were intimitaded because of this gruesome appearence and surrendered immediately when they saw the smoking, glowing black beard.
Blackbeard gave his new ship the name “The Queen Anne’s Revenge”. He sailed the vessel until 1718, when he sailed it into the Beaufort Inlet. It was there that he intentionally ran the ship aground. He was trying to trick most of the crew members and get all the goods and booty for himself and his favorite crew members. He abandoned the ship in the inlet to be taken by the tide.
Actually he wanted to retire from the life as a privat but the lure of piracy was too much for Edward Teach, and he soon fell back into sailing looking for ships to plunder. On Ockracoke Island Lieutenant Maynard of the Royal Navy found Blackbeard anchored at his favorite spot on the south side of the island. His ships crept up on Blackbeard’s and a fierce battle broke out between them. Both sides took heavy casualties, and eventually Blackbeard was killed in battle overwhelmed by the training and firepower of the Royal navy. Blackbeard’s head was cut off and his body thrown overboard where legend has that it swam around the ship several times before sinking. The skull was displayed as a trophy on Mayard’s arrival in Bath and in Virginia.
Source: http://historicbeaufort.com/story.htm

 


Who was Molly Malone afer who the famous Irish Pub in LA and so many other pubs in the worls are named ?
As well as being known and sung internationally, the popular song ‘Cockles and Mussels’ has become a sort of unofficial anthem of Dublin city. The song’s tragic heroine Molly Malone and her barrow have come to stand as one of the most familiar symbols of the capital. . It seems perfectly natural therefore that Molly should have been commemorated by erecting a statue to her in Dublin, which monument has become a familiar landmark at the corner of Grafton Street and Suffolk Street. Let us now travel back in time to see what we can find out about the real Molly Malone. and of her short and tragic life. Molly’s parents are also in the fish-selling business, and reside near Fishamble Street, where the trade is mostly carried on. ‘In a city full of pretty girls, she was one of the prettiest, and that is how she came to ply another trade as well’, our host tells us sadly. Molly had wheeled her wheel barrow from the Liberties to the more fashionable Grafton Street, crying ‘Cockles and Mussels’ as she went. At nights another and less admirable Molly appeared, as her chemise, basque and zapotas were replaced by an even more revealing dress, fish-net tights and stillettoes. Thus provocatively attired, she sallied forth looking for clients, who tended to include students of Trinity College, a place renowned for its debauchery. One day Molly Malone died very unexpected and suddenly of a fever. Molly Malone
In Dublin’s fair city,
Where the Girls are so pretty,
I first set my eyes,
On sweet Molly Malone,
As she wheeled her wheel barrow,
Through the streets broad and narrow,
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive o!

Alive alive o!
Alive alive o!
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive o!

She was a fish monger,
And sure it was no wonder,
For so were her
Father and Mother before,
And they both wheeled their barrow,
Through the streets broad and narrow,
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive o!

Alive alive o!
Alive alive o!
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive o!

She died of a fever,
And no one could save her,
And that was the end
Of sweet Molly Malone,
But her ghost wheels her barrow,
Through the streets broad and narrow,
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive o!

Alive alive o!
Alive alive o!
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive o!

 


Is the song “Factory Girls” related to traditional Irish Music?
Yes, it’s a homage to “Whiskey on a Sunday”. The chorus of both songs has the same lyrics.

 


Who is the skater at the Video of “Drunken Lullabies?
It is Patrick Melcher

 

 

In which Bands did the musicias of Flogging Molly already play?
Dave was many years the lead- singer of Fastwayand released one album with Katmandu
Bob was the bass-player od Nickel
The other band members played, before the joined Flogging Molly, with several unknown bands . Bridget is the only one who played traditional irish music before, the others were all members of Rock or Punk-Rock-Bands

 

 

Who is on the cover of Drunken Lullabies?
Nobody realy knows who that is. Flogging Molly were trying to come up with an album cover and that was the only thing everybody could agree upon by deadline. Some people say it’s the Elephant Man

 

 

Who wrote “the rare ould times”?
That song was written by Pete St John

 


“Within a mile of home” contains a song called “To youth my sweet coisin dubh. What does that mean?
“Roisin dubh’ is gaelic and means black Rose.The legend of Roisin Dubh (pron. Row sheen dove): Many score years after the greatest hero of the western hemisphere, Cuculain, son of the god Lug, made his last stand before the army of Medb the queen of Connachta, there lived in Eriu near Briug na Boinde a council of Druids. These Druids wore black and red robes on which their symbol, the Roisin Dubh, the Black Rose, was visible.
RoisinDubh, written in the 16th to 19th century, is one of Ireland’s most famous political songs. It is based on an older love-lyric in which the title referred to the poet’s beloved rather than, as here, being a pseudonym for Ireland. The intimate tone of the original carries over into the political song. It’s the national saga of Ireland

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*